InuYasha
Advertisement

See also: Saigū-Yumi

The Sacred longbow of Mount Azusa (梓山の長弓, Azusa-yama no Chōkyū) is a powerful weapon that resides in a shrine on the mountain. It is acquired by Kagome to help Kikyō and later was essential in Naraku's spiritual demise from the material world. It is protected by the Spirit of Mount Azusa.

Powers and abilities[]

  • Vast spiritual power: The bow has been stated to contain such a vast amount of spiritual power that even Naraku feared it greatly.
  • Teleportation: Its most prominent ability is the power to hit whatever the shooter wished, no matter where they are or what is in between them and their target. This is accomplished by passing directly through, whatever is the target's way, such as a barrier or other obstacle such as a person. That made it a huge problem for Naraku, who usually used barriers and other people to hide behind or even fight remotely from afar.

Trivia[]

  • The Mount Azusa Longbow is likely a nod to a real-life Azusa Yumi (梓弓, lit. "Catalpawood Bow"), a kind of bow, made from the wood of a Catalpa (or Japanese cherry birch Betula grossa tree), and considered to be a sacred bow (Yumi) in Japan.
    • The Mount Azusa Longbow may also be a nod the Longbow wielded by Emperor Jimmu, the great-grandson of the sun goddess, Amaterasu, and the first human ruler of Japan. His bow was made of Azusa wood, specifically the Betula grossa (or Japanese cherry birch). The Mount Azusa Longbow and Emperor Jimmu's may very-well be the one-&-the-same Longbow (but there's no confirmation for this). The legend surrounding Emperor Jimmu and his Longbow states that, once, a golden bird perched on the bow of Emperor Jimmu; this was seen as an extremely good omen; Jimmu's bow developed the power to dispel evil by the mere plucking of its string. Since that time, 59 azusa yumi (29 vermilion and 30 black - vermilion signifying male energy and black female energy) have been enshrined at the Ise Grand Shrine, Japan's most important Shintō shrine and the main residence of Amaterasu.
Advertisement